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Digital Forensics & Incident Response

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InfoSec News Nuggets 08/25/2021

Razer bug lets you become a Windows 10 admin by plugging in a mouse

A Razer Synapse zero-day vulnerability has been disclosed on Twitter, allowing you to gain Windows admin privileges simply by plugging in a Razer mouse or keyboard. Razer is a very popular computer peripherals manufacturer known for its gaming mouses and keyboards. When plugging in a Razer device into Windows 10 or Windows 11, the operating system will automatically download and begin installing the Razer Synapse software on the computer. Razer Synapse is software that allows users to configure their hardware devices, set up macros, or map buttons. Razer claims that that their Razer Synapse software is used by over 100 million users worldwide. Security researcher jonhat discovered a zero-day vulnerability in the plug-and-play Razer Synapse installation that allows users to gain SYSTEM privileges on a Windows device quickly.

 

38M Records Were Exposed Online—Including Contact-Tracing Info

MORE THAN A thousand web apps mistakenly exposed 38 million records on the open internet, including data from a number of Covid-19 contact tracing platforms, vaccination sign-ups, job application portals, and employee databases. The data included a range of sensitive information, from people’s phone numbers and home addresses to social security numbers and Covid-19 vaccination status. The incident affected major companies and organizations, including American Airlines, Ford, the transportation and logistics company J.B. Hunt, the Maryland Department of Health, the New York City Municipal Transportation Authority, and New York City public schools. And while the data exposures have since been addressed, they show how one bad configuration setting in a popular platform can have far-reaching consequences.

 

Ransomware Groups to Watch: Emerging Threats

As part of Unit 42’s commitment to stop ransomware attacks, we conduct ransomware hunting operations to ensure our customers are protected against new and evolving ransomware variants. We monitor the activity of existing groups, search for dark web leak sites and fresh onion sites, identify up-and-coming players and study tactics, techniques and procedures. During our operations, we have observed four emerging ransomware groups that are currently affecting organizations and show signs of having the potential to become more prevalent in the future.

 

BBB Scam Alert: Ordering takeout? Watch out for fake websites

The COVID-19 pandemic has made ordering takeout more popular than ever. Some restaurants have set up their own websites to avoid the fees and challenges that come with food delivery apps, like DoorDash or GrubHub. As always, scammers are quick to pick up on a trend. Watch out for fake food ordering websites that scam consumers out of their money and personal information. You search for your favorite restaurant’s website to see if they offer delivery and a way to order online. Near the top of the search results, you find a website that looks like it belongs to the restaurant. Or you may find a third-party website that looks very professional and similar to popular services like DoorDash or GrubHub.

 

How Data Brokers Sell Access to the Backbone of the Internet

There’s something of an open secret in the cybersecurity world: internet service providers quietly give away detailed information about which computer is communicating with another to private businesses, which then sells access to that data to a range of third parties, according to multiple sources in the threat intelligence industry. The information, known as netflow data, is a useful tool for digital investigators. They can use it to identify servers being used by hackers, or to follow data as it is stolen. But the sale of this information still makes some people nervous because they are concerned about whose hands it may fall into. At a high level, netflow data creates a picture of traffic flow and volume across a network. It can show which server communicated with another, information that may ordinarily only be available to the server owner or the ISP carrying the traffic. Crucially, this data can be used for, among other things, tracking traffic through virtual private networks, which are used to mask where someone is connecting to a server from, and by extension, their approximate physical location.

 

Hundreds of thousands of Realtek-based devices under attack from IoT botnet

A dangerous vulnerability in Realtek chipsets used in hundreds of thousands of smart devices from at least 65 vendors is currently under attack from a notorious DDoS botnet gang. The attacks started last week, according to a report from IoT security firm SAM, and began just three days after fellow security firm IoT Inspector published details about the vulnerability on its blog.  Tracked as CVE-2021-35395, the vulnerability is part of four issues IoT Inspector researchers found in the software development kit (SDK) that ships with multiple Realtek chipsets (SoCs). These chips are manufactured by Realtek but are shipped to other companies, which then use them as the basic System-on-Chip (SoC) board for their own devices, with the Realtek SDK serving as a configurator and starting point for their own firmware.

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