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InfoSec News Nuggets 7/30/2020

A Cyberattack on Garmin Disrupted More Than Workouts

ON THURSDAY, HACKERS hit the navigation and fitness giant Garmin with a ransomware attack that took down numerous services across the company. Garmin Connect, the cloud platform that syncs user activity data, went dark, as did portions of Garmin.com. But as athletes found themselves unable to record runs and workouts, pilots who use Garmin products for position, navigation, and timing services in airplanes were dealing with their own problems.

 

Alcohol delivery service Drizly confirms data breach

Online alcohol delivery startup Drizly  has told customers that it was hit by a data breach. In an email to customers obtained by TechCrunch,  the company said that a hacker “obtained” some customer data. The hacker took customer email addresses, date-of-birth, passwords hashed using the stronger bcrypt algorithm, and in some cases delivery address, the email read. As many as 2.5 million Drizly accounts are believed to have been stolen. TechCrunch obtained a portion of the data, including several accounts of Drizly staff members. We verified the data against public records. The portion of data we obtained also contains user phone numbers, IP addresses, and geolocation data associated with the user’s billing address.

 

The Cold War Bunker That Became Home to a Dark-Web Empire

In the mid-nineteen-seventies, the West German Army, the Bundeswehr, built a vast underground bunker near the town of Traben-Trarbach. It was five stories deep, had nearly sixty thousand square feet of floor space, and was designed to withstand a nuclear attack. Eighty days’ worth of survival provisions were stored inside, including an emergency power supply and more than a million litres of drinking water. You entered the facility through an air lock; the interior temperature was set to seventy degrees. 

 

US officials: Russia behind spread of virus disinformation

Russian intelligence services are using a trio of English-language websites to spread disinformation about the coronavirus pandemic, seeking to exploit a crisis that America is struggling to contain ahead of the presidential election in November, U.S. officials said Tuesday. Two Russians who have held senior roles in Moscow’s military intelligence service known as the GRU have been identified as responsible for a disinformation effort meant to reach American and Western audiences, U.S. government officials said. They spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly.

 

NIST selects algorithms to form a post-quantum cryptography standard

After spending more than three years examining new approaches to encryption and data protection that could defeat an assault from a quantum computer, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has winnowed the 69 submissions it initially received down to a final group of 15. NIST has now begun the third round of public review. This “selection round” will help the agency decide on the small subset of these algorithms that will form the core of the first post-quantum cryptography standard. “At the end of this round, we will choose some algorithms and standardize them,” said NIST mathematician Dustin Moody. “We intend to give people tools that are capable of protecting sensitive information for the foreseeable future, including after the advent of powerful quantum computers.”

 

Big tech CEOs release opening statements before antitrust hearing

The big tech antitrust hearing with the House Judiciary Committee is set to occur tomorrow, July 29th at 12PM ET. But all four CEOs — Jeff Bezos of Amazon, Sundar Pichai of Google, Tim Cook of Apple, Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook — have released their opening statements early. In all of them, the CEOs attempted to make the case that as successful as their companies are, they do not represent a monopolistic force in the industry. It will be Bezos’s first time testifying before the House. Unsurprisingly, Bezos, Pichai, Zuckerberg and Cook claimed that their businesses are good for the American economy. 

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